Wild Lettuce: The best natural painkiller that grows in your backyard…

Lactuca virosa - Köhler–s Medizinal-Pflanzen-213.jpg
 Wild Lettuce (Photo Source)

Lactuca Virosa is the scientific term for it, and many people have used it in place of addictive prescription pain medicine. It’s a leafy and tall plant, with small yellow buds, and could be grown right out your door. More commonly found in North America and England, it’s a cousin to the lettuce we typically see at the grocery store. It’s also referred to as bitter lettuce, or more appropriately for the purpose discussed here, opium lettuce.

http://beforeitsnews.com/self-sufficiency/2017/03/similar-to-morphine-the-best-natural-painkiller-that-grows-in-your-backyard-2517171.html

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Mass Action Can Change Society

International Socialists

Anti-mining March 2010 Auckland march against mining, 2010

By Shomi Yoon

The mass of ordinary people who can change society. The ruling class, the capitalist media, and academia all stress workers’ powerlessness, and these ideas often filter through to people who want to change the world. The emphasis can get put on heroic individuals, spectacular action designed to ‘shock’ the masses out of their alleged passivity, or a focus on stunts for media attention. But, for society to change, we need to draw in the greatest numbers of people into activity possible. This isn’t just because we have ‘strength in numbers’, although that matters. It’s because, historically, the involvement of ordinary people in their masses has led to wins for our side.

If there is a clear lead and purpose, people will march in their thousands. In 2010 a 40,000-strong march in Auckland against mining in the national parks prompted a humiliating back-down…

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Worsening Poll results for National in March 2017…

11813447_1030681496977128_2632324681795510212_n12105781_10153218049156452_8373725972874904774_nDuring March support for National fell by 4.5% to 43.5%, now just behind a potential Labour/ Greens alliance 44% (up 5%). If a New Zealand Election was held now the latest New Zealand Roy Morgan Poll shows it would be too close to call with New Zealand first likely to play a decisive role in determining which parties would form the next Government.
Is this a reason for an early election? Could they or would they wait for a worse poll result?

NZSAS allegedly killed civilians in a retaliatory raid in Afghanistan in 2010

Authors Nicky Hager, left, and Jon Stephenson with their book, Hit & Run during the launch at Unity Books in Wellington. Photo / Mark Mitchell
Authors Nicky Hager, left, and Jon Stephenson with their book, Hit & Run during the launch at Unity Books in Wellington. Photo / Mark Mitchell

New Zealand elite soldiers killed six civilians and injured 15 during a raid in Afghanistan in 2010, author Nicky Hager’s new book alleges.

Hager is launching his latest book Hit & Run at an event in Wellington.

Hundreds of people have crammed into the Unity Books store, including a large media contingent.

Hundreds of people, including a large media contingent, crammed into the Unity Books store for the book's launch. Photo / Nicholas Jones
Hundreds of people, including a large media contingent, crammed into the Unity Books store for the book’s launch. Photo / Nicholas Jones

Hit & Run, which was co-authored with freelance war journalist Jon Stephenson, is based on the Security Intelligence Service’s (SAS) response to the first New Zealand death in combat in the country.

Soldiers involved in the raid approached the two authors and said they believed they had been involved in war crimes, Hager said at the book launch today.

New Zealand’s Defence Minister at the time of the raid, Wayne Mapp, has previously said that no civilians were killed.

Speaking to media after the book launch, Hager said he and Stephenson had discussed the raid with legal experts and they had said there were grounds to suspect war crimes had been committed.

“That is a very serious allegation and it has to be determined by experts, which is why we are calling for an inquiry.”

Both Hager and Stephenson said they believed some of their sources would be willing to front an inquiry if it were established.

‘Apple’ pays zero tax in NZ despite sales of $4.2 billion…

Apple's New Zealand operations are wholly owned by an Australian parent and appear to be run from there. Photo / AP
Apple’s New Zealand operations are wholly owned by an Australian parent and appear to be run from there. Photo / AP

Consumer electronics giant Apple paid no income tax to Inland Revenue over the past decade despite selling billions of dollars worth of iPhones and iPads to New Zealanders.

The revelations about Apple’s local tax bill – in addition to international concerns about its use of havens such as Ireland – have sparked concerns a recently announced government crackdown on multinational tax avoidance may not go far enough.

Green Party co-leader James Shaw said Apple was not paying its fair share.

“It is absolutely extraordinary that they are able to get away with paying zero tax in this country. I really like Apple products – they’re incredibly innovative – but it looks like their tax department is even more innovative than their product designers,” Shaw said.

New Zealanders are avid Apple consumers – especially of its high-end iPhone handsets – and the company accounted for a quarter of the local smartphone market last year.

According to figures compiled by industry analysts IDC, Apple sold 221,000 phones here in the three months to December.

Over the past decade, mostly thanks to the iPhone revolutionising the mobile phone, Apple grew to become the world’s largest and most profitable company. According to financial statements for the company’s local subsidiary, Apple Sales New Zealand, record total sales here since 2007 were $4.2 billion.

The accounts also show apparent income tax payments of $37 million – but a close reading shows this sum was paid to Inland Revenue but was actually sent abroad to the Australian Tax Office, an arrangement that has been in place since at least 2007.

Read more:

http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11820240